Sunbeam S8 Gallery

Year
Bike
Picture
Description
0
sunbeam s7/8
sunbeam s7/8
1929
Sunbeam Model 8
Sunbeam Model 8
1949
Sunbeam S8 1949
1949 Sunbeam S8
1950
1950 sunbeam s8
sunbeam s8 1950
image supplied by www.andybuysbikes.com
1950
1950 sunbeam s8
sunbeam s8 1950
image supplied by www.andybuysbikes.com
1950
1950 sunbeam s8
sunbeam s8 1950
1950
1950 sunbeam s8 sports
sunbeam s8 sports 1950
1950
1950 sunbeam s8 with steib sidecar outfit
sunbeam s8 with steib sidecar outfit 1950
1951
Sunbeam S8
1951 Sunbeam S8
1952
Sunbeam S8 - Sport Model
Sunbeam S8 - Sport Model
1953
1953 sunbeam s8
sunbeam s8 1953
image provided by www.classic-auctions.com.
1953
Sunbeam S8
1953 Sunbeam S8
Sunbeam introduced the 500cc S7 to the public during 1947. The new model was intended as the "group flagship" and consequently, Erling Poppe, it's chief architect, designed a machine that incorporated many innovative features. The short-stroke, overhead cam, in line twin cylinder engine was mated to a shaft final drive via a four speed gearbox with an under slung "worm" gear transmitting the drive to the rear wheel. The all alloy engine and gearbox were mounted in a duplex frame equipped with plunger rear suspension, telescopic forks, 16 inch balloon tyres and sprung saddle all contributed to providing a comfortable ride. Unfortunately the luxurious specification came with a weight penalty, the new model weighing considerably more than 400lbs, Harsh running and a peaky power delivery had been identified during pre production testing and resulted in the engine being detuned. Consequently the machine struggled to exceed 75mph when tested, comparable to a far cheaper ohv 350cc single resulting in poor sales, potential buyers admired the technical specification but opted for the quicker and cheaper parallel twins then available. In response to the poor sales BSA introduced a revised model, adopting new forks during 1949 together with a lighter, altogether, more sporting model variant typed the S8. The S8 reverted to normal section tyres and employed standard BSA forks and front brake. The result was a machine that handled with greater precision without sacrificing the high level of comfort afforded by the design to any great extent and looked "lighter whilst production costs were reduced thanks to the employment of the "stock" BSA forks and front brake unit. The two machines continued to be offered until 1957, selling steadily to their target market of discerning enthusiasts a, trend that continues today. Image provided by www.classic-auctions.co.uk.
1954
1954 sunbeam s8 sports
sunbeam s8 sports 1954
1954
1954 sunbeam s8 sports
sunbeam s8 sports 1954
1958
1958 sunbeam s8
sunbeam s8 1958